Transvaginal Mesh: What You Need to Know

medical mesh
medical mesh

If you’ve had surgery to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP) or stress urinary incontinence, your doctor might have implanted a surgical mesh product during your procedure. Almost one third of these types of procedures utilize surgical mesh, and this percentage is growing daily, despite FDA warnings and product recalls. My employment offers me a unique perspective into the disturbing world of medical products, where products can create enormous complications and their manufacturers are less than honest.

Let’s start from the beginning. POP and stress urinary incontinence operations used to be exclusively surgical procedures, where the physician would use his or her skills in order to best repair weak tissue and prevent the offending condition from reoccurring. It usually took doctors several years before they acquired the necessary experience to perform these operations successfully. Until about the 1990s, that is… when medical providers began to sell healthcare providers on what they thought was the perfect solution: synthetic mesh.

Since that time, use of synthetic mesh in POP and incontinence operations has skyrocketed, creating a tailspin of unintended consequences and lifelong complications in the patients unfortunate enough to have had one implanted in their bodies. Most mesh products are made from polypropylene, a polymer you’d commonly think of as plastic. Now here’s the crazy part: the major manufacturers create their transvaginal mesh products from the byproducts of industrial petroleum operations. That’s right. These companies are instructing doctors to implant a petroleum waste product, an entirely foreign object into women’s most sensitive areas to threat their complications.

Because transvaginal mesh products are only classified as a “Category II” of the three categories established by the FDA, they were not subject to the most rigorous testing before they were approved for use on the open market. Complications don’t always ensue after implantation, but when they do, they can be pretty nasty. Some side effects that women I’ve dealt with have reported include bleeding, chronic back pain, bloating, and pain during intercourse. Removing the mesh can be difficult as well, as tissue grows around the product after it is implanted.

If you’re worried about an operation you had, I suggest requesting a copy of your medical records immediately. That way you can determine whether or not a mesh product was used in your operation (sometimes doctors do not inform their patients of this, so be sure to check for yourself). If you’re experiencing ongoing complications, consult a doctor and discuss the feasibility of having the transvaginal mesh removed, if possible. And finally, although you might never be able to rid yourself of the terrible complications from these products, odds are good that you have a solid legal claim on your hands. Make sure you check the FDA website regularly, as it seems they are finally catching onto the true danger behind transvaginal mesh products. Be sure to get the word out so other women don’t have to potentially experience the complications that you face daily.

Knowledge is power. Finding objective information about transvaginal mesh can be daunting because it has been whitewashed for so long. But hopefully this article provided you with a solid starting point… best of luck!

More information about transvaginal mesh [http://transvaginalmeshfailure.com/] and the tools you need to file a products liability lawsuit.

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